Culinary explorations & adventures in community

This September, I had a chance to go visit my family on the mainland.  Here are a few of the wonderful things I saw:

  • Fall harvest vegetables grown just outside the city.  There are white pumpkins and wing squashes along with other varieties.
  • Food truck rally – I found it fascinating that one of the trucks was painted with the phrase “Recession Dining”.  The food truck culture was huge there!  To my surprise (and joy) there was a truck that had a couple of vegan options, one of which had already sold out.
  • My favorite truck was Native Foods.  The woman who owned it was a young woman with so much love and joy for cooking.  Her passion came through in the flavors.  I nibbled a little bit of the fry bread and tasted some of her french fries.  She made tacos and enchiladas with the fry bread as a shell.
  • The last thing was an amazing new health food store complete with a demo kitchen and community room.  How I wish it were mine!

 

Multi-sensory Cooking Exercise

The next time you cook, pay close attention to every single action that you perform in the kitchen. Don’t think about what you have to do later in the day or what you did that morning. Think about the rice you are washing, the carrot you are cutting in long, thin matchsticks, or the broccoli you’re steaming. Look at the color of the vegetable in your hand, examine its various features. Cut it open and appreciate its complexity and variety—the seeds or the pattern. Taste it, smell it, and feel its texture. Think about where it came from, how it grew in the sun, how it was washed with the rain. Contemplate its harvest, its journey from the field to the store or supermarket. Appreciate every item of food that you prepare. Be with the food, don’t be somewhere else. Cut it carefully. Cook it mindfully. Pay attention. http://www.snowlight.com/keys.html

Healing Foods: Parsley

If you’ve been to my cooking classes,  you probably know how much I love parsley! Here are the reasons why:

Parsley’s volatile oils qualify it as a “chemoprotective” food, and in particular, a food that can help neutralize particular types of carcinogens (like the benzopyrenes that are part of cigarette smoke and charcoal grill smoke). In addition to its volatile oils and flavonoids, parsley is an excellent source of two vital nutrients that are also important for the prevention of many diseases: vitamin C and vitamin A (notably through its concentration of the pro-vitamin A carotenoid, beta-carotene). Some studies indicate that vitamin C-rich foods, such as parsley, provide humans with protection against inflammatory polyarthritis, a form of rheumatoid arthritis involving two or more joints.

 

Last Sunday’s “Got Spice?” cooking class

In the 8/12 Got Spice? cooking class I taught how to make:

  • Smoky Chipotle Black Bean Dip
  • Red Lentil Tagine
  • Thai Vegetable Soup

And more from when I was setting up and waiting for all the participants to arrive…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We have one more class in the series coming up on 8/19! CSA BOX

Got Spice?

Want more balance in your life? Tired of having cravings? Want to know how to enhance to flavor of your food, naturally? Come find out this Sunday the importance of flavor in your food in “Got Spice?”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This coming Sunday is the “Got Spice?” cooking class!

[FULL STORY]

Reducing Medication

By Terry Shintani, M.D., J.D., M.P.H.
President, Hawaii Heath Foundation

What if you could reduce your need for medication in just 10 days? What if, at the same time, you saw your weight, cholesterol, blood pressure, blood sugar and chronic pain decrease, and your energy increase while eating more food?

This is how I believe medicine should be practiced – with [READ FULL STORY]

 

My Trip to Waikiki Worm Company

I’ve dabbled in composting before, but I was told that I wasn’t doing it quite right. I had a spinning composter, but worms don’t like to get tossed around. When I changed living arrangements, I sold my spinning composter and took a hiatus from the whole endeavor.

Throwing vegetable scraps away just didn’t feel right, and after attending the recent agriculture conference, I committed to seriously getting back into composting. I made my visit to the Waikiki Worm Company this afternoon and purchased all my new composting items. Here is the store owner getting my worms ready for me.

Mindy explained to me how to set up my system. First, I have to shred paper and place it into my composting bin.
Then, I take the pile of worms and separate it from the vermicast, sprinkling the vermicast onto the paper to make a nice bed for the earthworms. It’s important to water it so that it stays moist.
From there I take the ball of earthworms and place them onto the bed and let them wriggle their way into their bed of paper and vermicast.

Now I can begin to feed them, so I grabbed some alfalfa sprouts that I had leftover from a cooking class and sprinkled them in.

Finally, it’s important to cover the food with more paper, and then wet everything down, and place on the lid.

My system is now operational! I’m heading back to her shop on Saturday to pick up some compost tea to spray on the foilage of my plants.

I’m really seriously working on getting a big container garden going. Here is my kale, basil, thyme, chives, parsley, and Maui onions…. (hard to see but they are all in there!).

Cilantro and arugula are sprouting in some other containers…

Photos from the Lunch: Wraps & Spreads cooking class



Thanks again to Ruth for sharing her photos from the afternoon cooking class! I had some help rolling everything up for everyone so that we could move on to the next recipe. Looking forward to next week’s class, Lunch: Gourmet Bento Box Items